Leadership Simplified: Doug Van Dyke

Leadership Blog

Lakewood Ranch Leadership Institute

From a community growth standpoint, the Lakewood Ranch area is the fifth fastest growing community in the country. The burgeoning burg that is nestled between Sarasota and Bradenton is a bastion for businesses, as well as community-minded folk. Lakewood Ranch Leadership is thriving in many ways. Since our headquarters are a stone’s throw away, we here at Leadership Simplified like to think of ourselves as the Lakewood Ranch Leadership Institute. The Lakewood Ranch area (or LWR as they prefer), is brimming with talented leaders and dynamic organizations. It is only a matter of time before this dynamic enclave of Florida is nationally recognized. LWRLeadership is real. Hats off to a successful area, with an incredible future.

 

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© 2017 Leadership Simplified. All rights reserved.

Posted by Doug Van Dyke on 2017-01-17 at 07:00 AM
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Expectations - Hitting the Mark

Every so often leaders find themselves in a situation when they need to share/update workplace expectations with a colleague. A great starting point is a working agreement. However, a technique to leverage during a follow up conversation is Hits, Misses, and Housekeeping. This simple construct is teed-up as follows:

“During our 30 minute conversation, I would like to share the many hits (or good things) that you and your team are doing. Also, I would like to share items that fell through the cracks (misses), as well as a few housekeeping items. But first, will you share those three areas with me as it pertain to my team or my performance since the last time we met?”

This simple construct can provide a constructive means to address sticky issues. Also, if there are no misses to share, you reserve a space to discuss misses during future follow up meetings.

If you have not used this technique, practice it a few times with friends and family. Then, adjust the verbiage to your leadership style and give it a whirl. The outcomes may pleasantly surprise you!

Until next time, be well.

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Please do so, as long as you do not alter the content or embedded links. Also, please include the following information: Doug Van Dyke is a Tampa Bay based leadership development expert, executive coach, and strategic planner. To learn more about leadership development programs, coaching and consulting services, visit www.leadershipsimplified.com.

Posted by Doug Van Dyke on 2016-02-21 at 10:30 AM
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Presentation Skills - How Leaders Become Better Speakers

There are a variety of ways to raise the bar regarding speaking excellence. Here are a smattering of tips for you to consider.

  1. Embrace the mantra of “Being Distinctive.” In other words, seek to raise your level of skill and preparedness so that you are clearly differentiated from other speakers.
  2. Be strategic when preparing for a speaking engagement:
    1. Make certain the room is setup to best fit with your presentation
    2. Request a wireless microphone
    3. Get out from behind a podium and use movement to connect with the entire audience
  3. For audiences of 50 or more, request a tombstone monitor that simultaneously shows your PowerPoint to you as well as the audience.
  4. Avoid using notes
  5. Acknowledge that our voice is an instrument and demonstrate masterful vocal variety

 

Bottom Line: Leaders must possess the ability to move groups of people. A clear cut way to accomplish this is by upping the game regarding your ability to speak publicly. Embrace a positive mindset, practice like crazy, deliver meaningful content, and positively influence the minds and actions of your audience.

 

Until next time, be well.

 

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executive coach, and strategic planner. To learn more about leadership development programs, coaching and consulting services, visit www.leadershipsimplified.com.

Posted by Doug Van Dyke on 2015-10-18 at 09:05 AM
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10 Reasons to Attend Our Upcoming Leadership Boot Camp

By Doug Van Dyke, Leadership Simplified, www.leadershipsimplified.com



  1. The very next day you will implement three (3) new tools or techniques that will enhance your leadership effectiveness and help your team perform better.
  2. You will have fun!
  3. There will be a variety of cool people who attend.
  4. A roadmap of your future professional development will be unveiled.
  5. During lunch you can take a stroll on the Bradenton Riverwalk – a one mile health trail on the beautiful Manatee River.
  6. You will meet leaders from other businesses, with whom you can discuss best practices.
  7. At the end of the day you will be brimming with leadership ideas that you will be anxious to implement.
  8. You will experience two fun energy-building activities.
  9. The entire learning experience will be reinforced by reading materials and a CD that you can review again and again.
  10. Did I mention that only cool people who are solid professionals attend the event?

 

Join us on November 17, 2015 for our Leadership Boot Camp. We guarantee you will receive a handsome return on your investment of time and energy!

 

 

Do you want to use this blog post in print or online? 

Please do so, as long as you do not alter the content or embedded links. Also, please include the following information: Doug Van Dyke is a Tampa Bay based leadership and collaboration consultant, executive coach, and strategic planner. To learn more about leadership development programs, coaching and consulting services, visit www.leadershipsimplified.com. 

© 2015 Leadership Simplified. All rights reserved.

Posted by Doug Van Dyke on 2015-09-03 at 08:22 AM
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Work-Life Balance Executive Coaching

 

By Doug Van Dyke, Leadership Simplified, www.leadershipsimplified.com

 

Last week the Business Observer interviewed me for their article entitled How To Turn It Off While On Vacation. The article is fun and informative! In the article I shared three tips on how busy executives and entrepreneurs can enjoy their vacations and maximize work-life balance.

 

  1. Vacation internationally. An international destination holds your best chance to “unplug” and to truly relax. Maintaining connectivity with your work-world is difficult, and often expensive. Thus, there are multiple incentives for you to actually relax and focus solely on having fun.

 

  1. Set a full agenda. This may sound stressful, but it won’t be if your agenda is filled with relaxation and fun. Special note: Let your significant other plan the agenda. It will be one less item for you to worry about, plus it could even be speckled with fun surprises.

 

  1. Seek to make as few decisions as possible. Decision-fatigue is real. Let’s face it, successful professionals make a LOT of decisions. Give yourself a break from this activity. It will give you more capacity to make decisions when you return, plus your decisions will be better, sharper, and more timely.  

 

Bottom Line: The best leaders renew their energy and focus by taking regular vacations. Give yourself an opportunity to maintain your edge, and to find work-life balance in the process.  

 

Do you want to use this blog post in print or online? 

Please do so, as long as you do not alter the content or embedded links. Also, please include the following information: Doug Van Dyke is a Tampa Bay based leadership and collaboration consultant, executive coach, and strategic planner. To learn more about leadership development programs, coaching and consulting services, visit www.leadershipsimplified.com. 

© 2015 Leadership Simplified. All rights reserved.

Posted by Doug Van Dyke on 2015-08-31 at 07:48 AM
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Targeted Engagement

 

By Doug Van Dyke, Leadership Simplified, www.leadershipsimplified.com

 

Team members who are truly engaged are more valuable, perhaps, than gold. There are compelling statistics regarding the benefits of having engaged employees. Yet many leaders attempt to motivate their employees by speaking in broad generalities. In their zeal to have employees engaged, these leaders do not share expectations that are specific enough. Former NBA coach Larry Brown was a master at helping his players realize targeted engagement. Here is a quick story.

 

The NBA has a 24-second possession clock. As such, when a team is on defense they have 24 seconds during which they attempt to stop the other team from scoring. Larry Brown, however, only asked his players for two seconds of defense. That’s right, just two seconds. He put it something like this: “When you are on defense I just want you to be totally engaged for two seconds. When the ball is passed to the man you are guarding, play the most intense defense of your life for two seconds until he passes the ball to a different player. The other 22 seconds enjoy your experience and remember how much you love the game of basketball.”

 

Larry Brown did a great job of helping his team target specific areas in which they would be engaged. As a result, his players responded and raised their level of engagement. The result? A lot of victories and a boatload of dedicated players.

 

How can leaders help their people to move beyond satisfaction and become engaged? One answer is to help them target their energy and passion. It is well worth your effort to engage your team members. The result will be an increase in productivity, better retention of key employees, and handsome additions to your bottom line.

 

 

Do you want to use this blog post in print or online? 

Please do so, as long as you do not alter the content or embedded links. Also, please include the following information: Doug Van Dyke is a Tampa Bay based leadership and collaboration consultant, executive coach, and strategic planner. To learn more about leadership development programs, coaching and consulting services, visit www.leadershipsimplified.com. 

© 2014 Leadership Simplified. All rights reserved.

Posted by Doug Van Dyke on 2014-10-31 at 09:31 AM
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Decision Fatigue & the Decision Fatigue Trap

 

By Doug Van Dyke, Leadership Simplified, www.leadershipsimplified.com

 

If you were in jail and found yourself scheduling a parole board hearing, what time of day would you choose? (If you are ever faced with this grim prospect you obviously missed reading our series of newsletters on ethics!) Back to the hearing, you probably would be so happy to have a parole hearing you would not care what time it was, right? Well, various studies have concluded that inmates who appear at hearings in the morning are paroled with a much greater frequency than those who appear in the afternoon. It turns out that the reason for this odd occurrence is a syndrome known as decision fatigue. According to Wikipedia, “Decision fatigue refers to the deteriorating quality of decisions made by an individual, after a long session of decision making.” President Obama is well-aware of decision fatigue. So much so that he limits the number of different colored suits and ties he wears so as to minimize the number and scope of decisions he makes during a day.   

 

In an article that appeared in the New York Times, the writer (John Tierney) stated that “No matter how rational and high-minded you try to be, you can’t make decision after decision without paying a biological price.” Mr. Tierney went on to say that decision fatigue is different from physical fatigue because you become low on mental energy as opposed to physical stamina. Further, Tierney stated that “The more choices you make throughout the day, the harder each one becomes for your brain…. eventually [your brain] looks for shortcuts.” The shortcuts come in the form of either making impulsive, often poor decisions, or in simply shutting down and making no decision. Either path can potentially create a problem. The problems that may occur, however, do not enter into the equation when we are suffering from decision fatigue.

 

The Decision Fatigue Trap

Often times, leaders who are experiencing decision fatigue become short-tempered or irritable. If you find yourself falling into the decision fatigue trap, consider embracing these steps to avoid or minimize potential problems.

  1. Morning: Set a designated time (60 – 90 minutes) in the morning in order to get mission-critical work accomplished and to make your most important decisions. If you consistently execute this you will find that your decisions will be better thought out, as well as more effective. Note: The earlier in the morning that you set a designated time, the better your results.
  2. Lunch & Snack. Seek to rejuvenate during lunch by exercising for 20 minutes. A brisk walk will do the trick. This will build energy (not deplete it) and help to “reset” your decision-making clock. Also, eat a salad. This will minimize any carbohydrate induced crash that you may experience in the mid-afternoon. Note: Eat a snack (apples, hummus, etc.) around 2:30 pm in order to stay energized.
  3. Repetition: Seek to repeat this routine for the next 16 work days in order to create a habit. If you are unable to commit to 16 consecutive days, consider making this a Tuesday & Thursday ritual.

 

Bottom Line: Decision fatigue is real. All leaders experience it to a greater or lesser extent. If you find yourself a bit irritable during the day, be wary of falling into the decision fatigue trap. Catch yourself, and change a couple of your behaviors in order to minimize any ill effects.

 

Good luck, be well, and make solid decisions!

 

Have you decided to use this blog post in print or online? 

Please do so, as long as you do not alter the content or embedded links. Also, please include the following information: Doug Van Dyke is a Tampa Bay based leadership and collaboration consultant, executive coach, and strategic planner. To learn more about leadership development programs, coaching and consulting services, visit www.leadershipsimplified.com. 

© 2013 Leadership Simplified. All rights reserved.

Posted by Doug Van Dyke on 2013-12-31 at 05:08 PM
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Seven Ways to Build Collaboration and Workplace Diversity

 

By Doug Van Dyke, Leadership Simplified, www.leadershipsimplified.com

 

If you are interested in creating a sense of connectedness in your organization, increased collaboration and enhanced diversity are nice places to start. The inclusive workplace climate that you can create will allow team members to work authentically, respect the organization, leverage talent, and increase productivity.

 

Here are seven best practices that can instill a collaborative climate and encourage a diverse workplace culture:

  1. Lead by example. If leaders do not exhibit collaborative behavior and create natural diversity, how can they expect their direct reports to do so?
  2. Maintain a suggestion box regarding ideas on how to increase collaboration and foster diversity. Give prizes for the ideas that are implemented.
  3. Hold other leaders and team members accountable to high standards.
  4. Seek to recruit and promote from a diverse pool of candidates. In this regard, consider using an initial selection process that is “blind.” In other words, conceal the ethnicity and gender of candidates as much as possible in order to mitigate selection bias.   
  5. Provide meaningful training and development to leaders with regard to collaboration and diversity.
  6. Mentor high-potential team members.
  7. Seek to measure collaboration and diversity whenever and wherever possible!

 

 

Do you want to use this blog post in print or online? 

Please do so, as long as you do not alter the content or embedded links. Also, please include the following information: Doug Van Dyke is a Tampa Bay based leadership and collaboration consultant, executive coach, and strategic planner. To learn more about leadership development programs, coaching and consulting services, visit www.leadershipsimplified.com. 

© 2013 Leadership Simplified. All rights reserved.

Posted by Doug Van Dyke on 2013-12-10 at 08:13 AM
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Employee Retention Plan

 

Retaining employees can be a challenging task. And keeping employees is not all about monetary compensation. In fact, it is more important to determine what makes individual employees feel engaged. In other words, seek to learn what gives team members in your workplace a sense of belonging. Remember that employees may have different wants, needs, and/or expectations. For instance, younger team members may desire more training and camaraderie in order to satisfy their career aspirations and social needs. As a general rule, employees tend to be happier and stay longer when their job delivers personal gain and a sense of purpose.

 

Two Keys to Remember:

  1. Consider every employee to be unique. In order to understand the wants and needs of your employees ask them one simple question: “What moves you?” This simple question will encourage dialogue. More importantly, the answer that is provided holds the promise of unlocking what kind of workplace climate creates a sense of belonging for that employee.

 

  1. Seek to be agile/anticipatory with regard to employee retention. While being flexible to workplace situations is necessary, this reactive trait may cause a leader to act too late with regard to retaining key employees. On the other hand, anticipating workplace situations that imperil employee retention gives leaders more time to take preventative action. In addition, agile/anticipatory leaders seem to always keep employee retention in the forefront of their minds.

 

Four Actions for Leaders to Bring to the Table:

  1. Recognition and Feedback.  If available, participate in company recognition programs that reward employees. Also, frequently and generously communicate positive feedback with team members. Hold group events that encourage intra-team and inter-team communication outside of the normal work environment. Further, make a big deal out of accomplishments, meaningful effort, and hard work. Always ask your employees for direct feedback on yourself and the organization in order to better understand their perceptions and concerns.

 

  1. Lead as a Visionary.  Tell employees where the organization is going, why organization is going there, and how your employees fit into the journey. Also, seek to lead your team by living the values of the organization, and communicate those values often.

 

  1. Develop Your People.  Effective leaders offer training and development in a planned fashion. Lay out a set of expectations for the employee so that both of you understand training needs, development goals, and the timeframe associated with enhanced professional skills.

 

  1. Monetary Compensation.  Studies show that monetary compensation, while a part of employee retention, is generally thought of as the last of four key items that are critical to retaining employees. Yet, it should not be discounted as part of your employee retention plan. Continually be aware of the market value of your employees. To the best of your control, make adjustments based on performance as well as competitive baseline salaries.

 

Remember, not every element of your employee retention plan is in your control.  Some, such as salary and benefits, you can merely influence. Company policies often dictate what can be changed in these areas. As such, stay agile and focus on things you can control. In this regard, seek to be a visionary leader, deliver training and development, and lavish your employees with recognition and positive feedback.

 

 

Do you want to use this newsletter in print or online? 

Please do so, as long as you do not alter the content or embedded links. Also, please include the following information: Doug Van Dyke is a Tampa Bay based leadership and collaboration consultant, executive coach, and strategic planner. To learn more about leadership development programs, coaching and consulting services, visit www.leadershipsimplified.com. 

© 2013 Leadership Simplified. All rights reserved.

Posted by Doug Van Dyke on 2013-12-02 at 01:59 PM
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Effective Feedback: Leaders Using “And” versus “But”

 

By Doug Van Dyke, Leadership Simplified, www.leadershipsimplified.com

 

Last month’s newsletter (Feedback Frenzy) focused on the delivery of effective feedback. Many thanks to all of you who commented on the newsletter and asked follow-up questions. One question that was raised was how to seamlessly transition from Pluses (i.e., positive feedback) to Deltas (i.e., constructive feedback). Frequently leaders use the word “but” when making this transition. For example, they may say: “….so keep doing those positive things, but I also need you to focus on doing ____ better.” While seemingly harmless, the use of the word “but” can send a message that the flavor of the conversation is taking a 180-degree turn. In the process of using “but,” positive statements that were shared can be wiped away because the team member will now focus intently on the transition topic, which they may not view as positive.

 

So how can leaders transition a feedback session into a constructive moment without diluting the positive comments that they shared? The answer is to embrace a technique that sales people have used for years; the use of the word “and” while transitioning a conversation. The main reason to use “and” is that it serves as a connectitive. In sum, by using “and,” a leader’s subsequent comments will be viewed as an extension of the previous comments. For example, a leader could say: “….so please keep doing those positive things, and realize that you could do even better by ____.” Thus, the use of “and” will effectively connect the wonderful positive feedback that you have shared, with a bit of the constructive. The end result will be constructive feedback that sticks, without washing away positive feedback that was shared. 

 

Bottom Line: It may sound easy to use “and” instead of “but” when delivering feedback, however, it can be quite difficult. Once mastered though, the “and” feedback technique will increase the stickability of your comments. In the process, you will help your team members to improve their performance while you save yourself a boatload of time.

 

Until next time leaders, be well!

 

 

Do you want to use this blog post in print or online? 

Please do so, as long as you do not alter the content or embedded links. Also, please include the following information: Doug Van Dyke is a Tampa Bay based leadership and collaboration consultant, executive coach, and strategic planner. To learn more about leadership development programs, coaching and consulting services, visit www.leadershipsimplified.com. 

© 2013 Leadership Simplified. All rights reserved.

Posted by Doug Van Dyke on 2013-10-30 at 02:09 PM
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Leadership Leverage – Vertical and Horizontal

 

By Doug Van Dyke, Leadership Simplified, www.leadershipsimplified.com

 

Successful professionals are interested in growing their careers. This can be a very positive trait, as long as they are interested in growing the careers of others in the process. On occasion, professionals grow their careers at the expense of others. This hurts team morale and creates ill will in the workplace. Other times, as professionals grow their careers, they do not stay connected with former direct reports and peers. Instead, they push former colleagues to the side in order to focus on their new challenges and opportunities. The resulting disconnection can be unfortunate for everyone. You see, work is a long and wonderful game. As such, it is truly the enlightened professional who seeks to create and maintain what I call vertical leverage and horizontal leverage.

 

Vertical leverage refers to having solid relationships at all levels of an organization. In other words, as your career grows seek to maintain meaningful work relationships with those people who are above you, on the same level of responsibility as you, and those who report to you or are below your title. Horizontal leverage refers to maintaining great working relationships with everyone in the organization who is of the same title or job responsibility as you. Keep in mind that as your career grows, your horizontal peers will change. The combination of vertical and horizontal leverage will prove to be invaluable when you are attempting to drive change, problem-solve, or take on complicated initiatives. In addition, it will help to spur organizational morale. Also, it is just flat out the right thing to do! It is easy for upward-minded professionals to lose sight of past work relationships. Do not fall into this trap. Instead, be nice, stay in touch, manage by wandering around, and keep collaborative relationships strong. The results will help everyone’s career to grow and your organization to thrive. 

 

 

Do you want to use this blog post in print or online? 

Please do so, as long as you do not alter the content or embedded links. Also, please include the following information: Doug Van Dyke is a Tampa Bay based leadership and collaboration consultant, executive coach, and strategic planner. To learn more about leadership development programs, coaching and consulting services, visit www.leadershipsimplified.com. 

© 2013 Leadership Simplified. All rights reserved.

Posted by Doug Van Dyke on 2013-10-28 at 12:30 PM
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3 Clues a Leader Has Your Back

 

By Doug Van Dyke, Leadership Simplified, www.leadershipsimplified.com

 

“I’ve got your back!” These words comprise one of the most revered comments on the planet. Whether you hear those beautiful words in your personal or professional life, they typically give you a sense of comfort and confidence. Sometimes leaders utter “I’ve got your back” to their team. That can be a wonderful moment, however, one of the foundations of good leadership is walking the walk. In other words, good leaders lead by example. Leaders have the opportunity to not only tell team members that they have their back, but also to show them that they have their back. There are many ways leaders can demonstrate this, today we examine three of them. 

 

  1. Communicate. If there is an issue swirling in your area of responsibility, go to the source in order to uncover what is truly going on. Encourage your team members to exhibit the same behavior. In the process, you avoid gossip and second-hand interpretations. This minimizes your organization’s grapevine and the petty distractions associated with gossiping.

 

  1. Give a Heads Up. As soon as you have information or are aware of an event that is going to hit one of your team members like a ton of bricks, let them know. If the event calls for delivering a tough message, prepare appropriately for engaging in a difficult conversation. Most organizations hate surprises (unless they are very pleasant). Likewise, the people on your team would much rather know that a freight train is heading their way, as opposed to hearing a loud horn just prior to impact.  

 

  1. Think Team First, Promotion Later. A clear signal that a leader does not have the backs of their team members is when the leader is more focused on their next promotion rather than promoting the people on their team. Want to incite a mutiny? Be self-centered. You’ll get a mutiny in no time. Want to have the undying loyalty of your people? Help them to grow and develop their skills. Help them position their careers so that they can advance. In other words, leaders who embrace a mantra of “I’ve got your back” help their team members to be successful. In the process, the overall organization thrives. In the end, a thriving organization is better positioned to promote a talented, selfless leader.  

 

Bottom Line: Let your behavior demonstrate an “I’ve got your back” attitude. When issues arise, go to the source for first-hand information and avoid second-hand drama. When times are tough, get gutsy and give people a heads up, even if it means sharing a difficult message. Think first about positioning your team members for success, and lastly about a promotion for you. An amazing thing happens when you cover the backs of your people – they cover your back as well!

 

Until next time, be well.

 

 

Do you want to use this newsletter in print or online? 

Please do so, as long as you do not alter the content or embedded links. Also, please include the following information: Doug Van Dyke is a Tampa Bay based leadership and collaboration consultant, executive coach, and strategic planner. To learn more about leadership development programs, coaching and consulting services, visit www.leadershipsimplified.com. 

© 2013 Leadership Simplified. All rights reserved.

Posted by Doug Van Dyke on 2013-09-25 at 09:53 AM
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Competencies of Excellent Leaders

 

By Doug Van Dyke, Leadership Simplified, www.leadershipsimplified.com

 

The formula for becoming an excellent leader is elusive. There are a litany of approaches and theories on leadership that address specific competencies. In fact, we addressed this topic in one of our more popular newsletters entitled Competencies of Leadership – Foot-Soldier, Aerial, Satellite. A recent study has tried their hand, and revealed the 16 competencies that they believe top leaders should possess. Here is a quick look at their top five:

  1. Takes Initiative
  2. Practices Self-Development
  3. Displays High Integrity and Honesty
  4. Drives for Results
  5. Develops Others

 

Not a surprising list. However, I find it interesting that developing oneself and developing team members placed in so high in the list. Certainly leaders must deliver results and be ethical in the process, but it is so important to help others grow along the way. Taking time to engage in formal and informal coaching is not only imperative to better accomplish team goals, but it is mission critical in increasing the bench strength of your organization. Remember: Good leaders develop other good leaders.    

 

Do you want to use this blog post in print or online? 

Please do so, as long as you do not alter the content or embedded links. Also, please include the following information: Doug Van Dyke is a Tampa Bay based leadership and collaboration consultant, executive coach, and strategic planner. To learn more about leadership development programs, coaching and consulting services, visit www.leadershipsimplified.com. 

© 2013 Leadership Simplified. All rights reserved.

Posted by Doug Van Dyke on 2013-09-04 at 07:07 AM
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How Does Your Customer View Your Team? A Commodity or a Deliverer of Value

By Doug Van Dyke, Leadership Simplified, www.leadershipsimplified.com

 

“Make yourself indispensable.” These wise words were uttered by Nido Qubein many years ago. And they still ring true today. What Mr. Qubein was referring to was to make yourself and your team so exceptional that it would be unthinkable for those who consume your products and/or services to ever replace you. In other words, the value that is delivered by your team is extraordinary and shopping around for an alternative to you would be a silly waste of time. Now, Nido did not provide a roadmap on how to make your team indispensable. Rather, it is the leader’s challenge to position their team in such a fashion that shall always be the team/provider of choice. 

 

Ponder your team or what you do for a moment. Odds are good that you and/or your team perform very well. Yet, what is the perspective of your customers? Do they view you and your team as simply doing a job or providing a service? In other words, do they view your team simply a commodity – something that can be replaced, used up, or traded out?

 

If you answered affirmative to any of these questions, think strategically about your team. What can you do to raise the bar? How can you differentiate yourself from others in the marketplace? And how can you best communicate and shamelessly self-promote  your team so that customers view you as truly extraordinary?

 

Let me know your thoughts, hurdles, and triumphs leaders. You know, I have confidence in your abilities to lead boldly and to deliver incredible value!

 

 

Do you want to use this blog post in print or online? 

Please do so, as long as you do not alter the content or embedded links. Also, please include the following information: Doug Van Dyke is a Tampa Bay based leadership and collaboration consultant, executive coach, and strategic planner. To learn more about leadership development programs, coaching and consulting services, visit www.leadershipsimplified.com.

© 2013 Leadership Simplified. All rights reserved.

Posted by Doug Van Dyke on 2013-08-29 at 09:48 AM
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5 Books You Like

 

By Doug Van Dyke, Leadership Simplified, www.leadershipsimplified.com

 

We received a lot of positive feedback regarding our recent newsletter entitled 7 Books I Like and Why.  Many of you also shared additional business books that you find of interest. Without further adieu, I present some popular selections recommended by our loyal readers.

  • The Power of Ethical Management by Norman Vincent Peale and Kenneth Blanchard
  • The "I" of the Storm by Gary Simmons
  • The Ten Commandments of Business and How to Break Them by William Fromm
  • The 5 Dysfunctions of a Team by Patrick Lencioni
  • The Leadership Challenge by James Kouzes and Barry Posner

 

 

Do you want to use this blog post in print or online? 

Please do so, as long as you do not alter the content or embedded links. Also, please include the following information: Doug Van Dyke is a Tampa Bay based leadership and collaboration consultant, executive coach, and strategic planner. To learn more about leadership development programs, coaching and consulting services, visit www.leadershipsimplified.com. 

© 2013 Leadership Simplified. All rights reserved.

Posted by Doug Van Dyke on 2013-08-28 at 07:11 AM
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